Dennis Tueart: My football journey – a review

Follow Dennis Tueart as he wins the FA cup with Sunderland, League Cup with City, playing in the USA and his time as a director at City. Learn about how City could have become Juventus' feeder club and being given a soap massage by Don Revie!

Dennis Tueart’s book: Dennis Tueart my football journey

Dennis Tueart’s book follows his career winning the FA cup with Sunderland, League Cup with City, playing in the USA and his time as a director at City. There are interesting pieces about his feud with Rodney Marsh, how Man City could have become Juventus’ feeder club and a rather disturbing photo of a naked Dennis being given a soap massage by Don Revie!

Dennis Tueart; My Footballing Journey is a worthy read which like the player offers much but never quite makes the big time.

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Full Review

Every team has a few video clips that are played time and time again. For City there are Bert Trautmann holding his neck, Denis Law ’74, Dickov’s slide at Wembley as well as Ricky “F*****g” Villa’s goal in the 81 FA cup final!

However there is one clip that, until Yaya’s goal against Stoke, had been shown more than most. Dennis Tueart’s overhead kick to win the ’76 league cup final was a great goal, but it is not for this reason that it has been shown. It has been shown to rub the nose of every City fan, 35 years of Dennis Tueart’s goal, since City won anything.

As a blue growing up in these years I have seen the clip many times. I had known that Tueart had played for City and scored the goal, but I didn’t know much about the player. Tueart later became a director and I heard him speak about the club and read about his subsequent dismissal as a director. His book detailing his football journey covers both times.

The foreword by the great Brazilian player, Carlos Alberto sums the book up well; this is perhaps a person that thinks he’s better than he is. The book details his days at Sunderland where they won the FA cup against the odds. Yet Tueart seems as he does throughout the book as the outsider. A feeling of resentment runs through out the book and a blame game at each stage of his career is apparent.

On many points I agree with Tueart, such as the feeling that certain flair players, namely Rodney Marsh and Georgio Kinkladze do not do much for the team. However the way the book is written feels like its the grumblings of a man who thought he knew best. A man who felt he was always in the right place at the wrong time.

Having said this Tueart shows a true understanding of the bond of a fan to his club. It is this understands that he feels other don’t have. There are interesting pieces about Tueart’s work with supporters groups and his understanding of the importance of home grown players, particularly at City.

City’s journey from the second division, during the post Swales years, is given an unique viewpoint from within the club as a director. I feel this may be the only book to cover this period in this manner as I can’t see David Bernstein, Franny Lee or John Wardle producing such a book.

Dennis Tueart; My Footballing Journey is a worthy read which like the player offers much but never quite makes the big time.

A true benefit of buying the book is that all royalties go to the Christies Cancer hospital in Manchester, which does wonderful work.

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